Staff


Mark Chaplain, Gregory Chair of Applied Mathematics, Head of the Group

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~majc/

Email: majc[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk

Recent publications

Biographical info & Research interests:

Mark holds The Gregory Chair of Applied Mathematics, a position he took up in May 2015. Previously he was at Bath University and Dundee University (where he held The Ivory Chair of Applied Mathematics). His main area of research lies in modelling solid tumour growth and related topics. During his PhD (1987-1990) he developed various reaction-diffusion-type partial differential equation models, mainly for the avascular phase of growth. Since then modelling cancer growth and treatment has remained his main research interest and he has developed a variety of novel mathematical models for all the main phases of solid tumour growth (avascular, tumour-induced angiogenesis, immune-response, vascular, invasion, metastasis). Much of his current work is focussed on what may be described as a systems approach to modelling cancer growth through the development of quantitative and predictive mathematical models i.e. "Mathematical Oncology", a field of research in its own right now which he has been involved in for the past 25 years. Over the past 5 years or so, he and colleagues have also developed models of chemotherapy treatment of cancer, focussing on cell-cycle dependent drugs, and also radiotherapy treatment. One of the new areas of research he has started recently is in modelling intracellular signalling pathways, specifically gene regulatory networks and transcription factors, using partial differential equation models.



Tommaso Lorenzi, Research Fellow

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~tl47/

Email: tl47[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk

Recent publications

Biographical info & Research interests:

Tommaso joined the University of St Andrews in late 2015. Previously he was FMJH postdoctoral research fellow at the École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, and FSMP postdoctoral research fellow at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie. Combining analysis and numerical simulation of partial differential equations with numerical simulation of stochastic individual-based models, his research aims to understand how the interplay between variation, selection and evolution of individual traits is mirrored in the adaptive dynamics of structured populations. He currently collaborates with cell biologists to elucidate the connections between phenotypic adaptation and the emergence of resistance to therapies in cancer cell populations, and with evolutionary biologists to study the evolution of social behaviours in spatially structured populations.



Chandrasekhar Venkataraman, Lecturer in Mathematical Biology

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~cv28/

Email: cv28[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk

Recent publications

Biographical info & Research interests:

Chandrasekhar joined the University of St Andrews in October 2015, prior to this he was an EPSRC funded research fellow at the University of Sussex and at the University of Warwick. In his research he seeks to model, analyse and simulate real world phenomena with a particular emphasis on biological problems. He has multiple collaborations with mathematicians on research topics such as the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations and the design, analysis and implementation of computational methods for their approximation, he also collaborates with experimentalists and applied scientists with a view to combining mathematical modelling with experimental observations to answer important questions in fields such as cell biology and development.

Post-doctoral fellows


Ruth Bowness

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~rec9/

Email: rec9[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk

Recent publications

Biographical info & Research interests:

Ruth is a postdoc, working as part of the Infection group in the School of Medicine. She joined the team in September 2012 to work with Professor Stephen Gillespie and his group on the PreDiCT-TB project, an EU consortium, which aims to speed up tuberculosis drug development. Ruth contributes to the modelling work package within this consortium: working with experimentalists, clinicians and pharmacologists. Since May 2015 Ruth has also been working with the mathematical biology group, developing a spatial model to describe tuberculosis disease progression and treatment. Her current research involves using partial and ordinary differential equations, and individual-based models to describe tuberculosis bacteria during an infection. Ruth also uses statistical modelling techniques to describe clinical trial and laboratory data.



Cicely Macnamara

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~ckm/

Email: ckm[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk

Recent publications

Biographical info & Research interests:

Cicely is a post-doctoral research assistant, working in the mathematical biology research group. She rejoined the University of St Andrews in June 2015 having gained a masters with distinction in mathematical biology at the University of Dundee the previous year. This followed a brief career break from academia - in which she taught at a private high school in England - and a simultaneous change of research direction - having studied for a PhD in Solar Physics (completed in 2011). Her current research interests are cancer-immune dynamics; intracellular dynamics including gene regulatory networks; individual-based cell-cell and cell-matrix modelling and cancer invasion. She uses a wide range of modelling techniques both analytic and numerical to solve both deterministic and stochastic systems. More recently she has begun work on individual-based modelling.

PhD students


Linnéa Franssen

Website: https://linneafranssen.wordpress.com/

Email: lcf4[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk



Biographical info & Research interests:

Linnéa is a PhD student in the University of St. Andrews Mathematical Biology group under the supervision of Mark Chaplain. She is originally from Germany but her love for Scotland drew her to study for an MSci in Mathematics at the University of Glasgow, for which she was awarded a 1st Class degree. During this time, she discovered her passion for Mathematical Biology and based both her Honours and her Master thesis in the field. Since beginning her PhD in February 2016 she has been modelling the process of cancer cells invading the extracellular matrix after breaking free from a primary avascular tumour. In this, she uses an individual-based game-theoretic approach, which is explicitly spatial.



Fiona Macfarlane

Website: http://www.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/~frm3/

Email: frm3[AT]st-andrews.ac.uk



Biographical info & Research interests:

Fiona started her PhD in 2015 at St. Andrews under the supervision of Mark Chaplain. Her research focus is multi-scale modelling of the immune response to cancer, focusing on the interactions between T cells and tumour cells. Ordinary differential equations, individual-based models and partial differential equations are used in the modelling approach.